Steven gundry quackwatch
Dinshah P. Ghadiali, MD, ME, DC, PhD, LLD, ND, DOpt, FFS, DHT, DMT, DST. Gundry SR. The Plant Paradox: The Hidden Dangers in "Healthy" Foods That Cause Disease and Weight Gain. New York, NY, Harper Wave, 2017. Each of the following has been involved in some way with the promotion or administration of questionable health products and/or services or with opposition to beneficial methods. I mean, if lectins are bad, then beans would be the worst, and so bean counters would presumably find that bean eaters cut their lives short, whereas the exact opposite may be true with legumes (beans, split peas, chickpeas, and lentils)—found to be perhaps the most important dietary predictor of survival in older people in countries around the world. As Dan Buettner points out in his Blue Zones work, lectin-packed foods "are the cornerstones of" the diets of all the healthiest, longest-lived populations on the planet. Plant-based diets in general, and legumes in particular, are a common thread among longevity Blue Zones around the world—the most lectin-lush food there is. And, if lectins are bad, then whole grain consumers should be riddled with disease—when, in fact, "whole grain intake is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease," the #1 killer of men and women; strokes, too; and total cancer; and mortality from all causes put together—meaning people who eat whole grains tend to live longer, and, get fewer "respiratory diseases, infectious diseases, diabetes, and all non-cardiovascular, non-cancer causes" to boot. And, not just in population studies. As I've shown, you can randomize people into whole-grain interventions, and prove cause-and-effect benefits. The same with tomatoes. You randomize women to a cup and a half of tomato juice or water every day, and all that nightshade tomato lectin reduces systemic inflammation, or has waist-slimming effects, reducing cholesterol as well as inflammatory mediators. Icons created by Eva Verbeek, Marco Galtarossa, Vladimir Belochkin, Dinosoft Labs, Rflor, B Farias, and Creative Outlet from The Noun Project. Li YF, Chang YY, Huang HC, Wu YC, Yang MD, Chao PM. Tomato juice supplementation in young women reduces inflammatory adipokine levels independently of body fat reduction. Nutrition. 2015 May;31(5):691-6. Li YF, Chang YY, Huang HC, Wu YC, Yang MD, Chao PM. Tomato juice supplementation in young women reduces inflammatory adipokine levels independently of body fat reduction. Nutrition. 2015 May;31(5):691-6. I mean, that's unbelievable. That's the opposite of the truth. Add egg yolks to people's diets, and their cholesterol goes up. I mean, how dare he say this? And, it's not like some, you know, harmless foolishness like saying the Earth is flat or something. Heart disease is the #1 killer of men and women—this can actually hurt people. So much for my benefit of the doubt. Dr. Gundry's The Plant Paradox Is Wrong 4.12 (82.47%) 794 votes. You may republish this material online or in print under our Creative Commons licence. You must attribute the article to NutritionFacts.org with a link back to our website in your republication. Connor WE, Hodges RE, Bleiler RE. The serum lipids in men receiving high cholesterol and cholesterol-free diets. J Clin Invest. 1961 May;40:894-901. This is an unusual video for me. Normally, I try to stay out of the "diet wars," and just stick to bringing you the latest science. There are roughly 100,000 papers published on nutrition in the peer-reviewed medical literature every year. We have a hard enough time just trying not to fall too far behind with that. Let me know what you think. Would you rather I do more of these reactive-type videos? Buettner D. The Blue Zones, 9 Lessons for Living Longer from the People Who've Lived the Longest. National Geographic Books; 2012. Buettner D. The Blue Zones, 9 Lessons for Living Longer from the People Who've Lived the Longest. National Geographic Books; 2012. Icons created by Eva Verbeek, Marco Galtarossa, Vladimir Belochkin, Dinosoft Labs, Rflor, B Farias, and Creative Outlet from The Noun Project. Below is an approximation of this video's audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. Alireza Panahpour, DDS ** (a/k/a Alex Pana, Alexander Pana). TEENs MT, Dorsett CS, King IB, Ostrander JG, Yamanaka WK. Effects of shellfish consumption on lipoproteins in normolipidemic men. Am J Clin Nutr. 1990 Jun;51(6):1020-7. Aune D, Keum N, Giovannucci E, Fadnes LT, Boffetta P, Greenwood DC, Tonstad S, Vatten LJ, Riboli E, Norat T. Whole grain consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and all cause and cause specific mortality: systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies. BMJ. 2016 Jun 14;353:i2716. Darmadi-blackberry I, Wahlqvist ML, Kouris-blazos A, et al. Legumes: the most important dietary predictor of survival in older people of different ethnicities. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2004;13(2):217-20. Dragon Dabik aka D.D. David (link to another. But, people kept emailing me about this book; so, I was like, fine, I'll check out the first citation. Chapter 1, citation 1: "forget everything you thought you knew was true." Diet books love saying that. For example: "Eating shellfish and egg yolks dramatically reduces total cholesterol." What?! Egg yolks reduce cholesterol? What is this citation? This is the paper he cites. And, here it is. By now, you know how these studies go. How do you show a food decreases cholesterol? You remove so much meat, cheese, and eggs that overall your saturated fat falls—in this case, about 50%. If you cut saturated fat in half, of course cholesterol levels are going to drop. So, they got a drop in cholesterol removing meat, cheese, and egg yolks. Yet, that's the paper he uses to support his statement "egg yolks dramatically reduce cholesterol.". Holiday Sale! 15% Off Plant-Based Nutrition Certificate With Promo Code: PBNHOLIDAY15 15% Off Plant-Based Nutrition Certificate Holiday Sale. John Oliver offers an entertaining account of the poor regulation of the dietary supplement industry. I first remember taking note of Goop when there were stories about Paltrow recommending that women steam their vaginas to "balance their hormone levels," whatever that means. I had first learned of this bizarre phenomenon nearly seven years ago, but it was brought back on my radar screen via Dr. Jen Gunter's blog, where she noted that Paltrow is wrong about just about everything she says about medicine and explained why it's not a good idea for women to steam their vaginas. Many people believe that herbal supplements are safer than prescription drugs because they are "natural" and they don't consider them "drugs." But, as Steven Novella, academic clinical neurologist at the Yale University School of Medicine, explains, First, Dr. Gunter, I have been in academic medicine for forty years and up until your posting, have never seen a medical discussion start or end with the "F-bomb," yet yours did. A very wise Professor of Surgery at the University of Michigan once instructed me to never write anything that my mother or TEEN wouldn't be proud to read. I hope, for the sake of your mother and TEEN, that a re-reading of your article fails his test, and following his sage advice, that you will remove it. Before a prescription and nonprescription drug is on the market, it undergoes years of research and rigorous testing for safety and efficacy and needs FDA approval to be sold. In contrast, herbal medicines and dietary supplements are not well tested for efficacy or safety (if they are tested at all); also, they are poorly regulated and often make outlandish and unfounded claims. Image credit: Kristina DeMuth. Image has been modified. But, you still want to give him the benefit of the doubt. People ask me all the time to comment on some new blog or book or YouTube video, and I have to sadly be like, look, there are a hundred thousand peer-reviewed scientific papers on nutrition published in the medical literature every year, and we can barely keep up with those. The Value of the Plant-Based Nutrition Certificate: A Graduate's Review. Li YF, Chang YY, Huang HC, Wu YC, Yang MD, Chao PM. Tomato juice supplementation in young women reduces inflammatory adipokine levels independently of body fat reduction. Nutrition. 2015 May;31(5):691-6. In retrospect, I find it rather odd that I never paid much attention to Goop. Goop (or is it goop?), as you might recall, is Gwyneth Paltrow's beauty/health/wellness website (and, of course, online store) that's been in the news a fair amount over the last several months. The reason is that Paltrow combines celebrity, beauty, and "wellness" with pure quackery, and every so often Goop publishes something advocating pseudoscience so outrageous that it attracts the attention of not just skeptics, but of the mainstream press and even late night comedians like Stephen Colbert. What I didn't realize is just how broad the quackery is, and, more importantly, how it is facilitated by actual physicians working with Goop. Before I get to that, though, let's take a brief trip down memory lane, where I'll explain how I became aware of just how much a wretched hive of scum and quackery Goop has become. That Goop would defend itself by referencing quackery just as ridiculous as earthing and homeopathy bespeaks a lack of self-awareness beyond black hole-level dense. Ditto for referencing an article on chronic Candida infection, a common quack diagnosis in which Candida is blamed for all manner of vague symptoms. It is a fake illness—or, SUPPLEMENTS– all goop doctors sell supplements– that typically will "cure" a long list of ailments (which usually includes some form of "fatigue"). This sketch made fun of the first inaugural Goop Summit, which garnered extensive news coverage, some good to neutral, some mocking, but, as they say, any publicity is good publicity. One thing the publicity did reveal is just how much about the money Paltrow is: Dr. Gundry writes on his website, "I believe I've discovered some unconventional truths about human nutrition." Unconventional? Yes. Truths? Not so fast. The Plant Paradox is written by an author who reminds us of his distinguished career in medicine, including his experience in research. Dr. Gundry says, "with all modesty" that he has "found there is a common cause for most health problems" and further that "it is based on ample research, including [his] own papers, published in peer-reviewed medical journals, but that no one has put it all together before." He goes on to say that so-called "health 'experts' have pointed to our laziness, our addiction to fast food" etc., but according to him, "sadly, they are wrong. [and that] the real cause is so well hidden that you would never have noticed it.". You'll note I never really addressed Dr. Gundry's thesis about lectins. That's what the next two videos are about—stay tuned: There is no good evidence showing that lectins cause disease. Earth shattering findings demand extraordinary scientific evidence. It would be nice to see some peer-reviewed science that supports his astounding claims, so we took a peek through the early part of the book to see what kind of references he offers. Pg 31– There's a claim that Egyptian mummies died overweight, with clogged arteries and diabetes. And the author insinuates this to be from grains. Really? Is it possible that these mummified rulers lived like all the other kings and queens through all of time, eating not like the peasant commoner but the wealthy elite, mostly gorging on animal foods and available processed foods (added fats, added sugars) that were available at the time? Hey Gwyneth Paltrow,. Recently a new book has captured public attention, The Plant Paradox, by Steven Gundry, MD, focused on the surprising claim that lectins are the source of most, perhaps all human disease. It's too time consuming to swat away every bit of nonsense that hits the popular media in nutrition, but we've been getting a lot of questions about this book and its premise, that lectins are the true culprit of our ills. I mean, that's unbelievable. That's the opposite of the truth. Add egg yolks to people's diets, and their cholesterol goes up. I mean, how dare he say this? And, it's not like some, you know, harmless foolishness like saying the Earth is flat or something. Heart disease is the #1 killer of men and women—this can actually hurt people. So much for my benefit of the doubt. But, you still want to give him the benefit of the doubt. People ask me all the time to comment on some new blog or book or YouTube video, and I have to sadly be like, look, there are a hundred thousand peer-reviewed scientific papers on nutrition published in the medical literature every year, and we can barely keep up with those. Connor WE, Hodges RE, Bleiler RE. The serum lipids in men receiving high cholesterol and cholesterol-free diets. J Clin Invest. 1961 May;40:894-901. Darmadi-blackberry I, Wahlqvist ML, Kouris-blazos A, et al. Legumes: the most important dietary predictor of survival in older people of different ethnicities. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2004;13(2):217-20. Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0). I mean, that's unbelievable. That's the opposite of the truth. Add egg yolks to people's diets, and their cholesterol goes up. I mean, how dare he say this? And, it's not like some, you know, harmless foolishness like saying the Earth is flat or something. Heart disease is the #1 killer of men and women—this can actually hurt people. So much for my benefit of the doubt. So, when people told me about this book, I was like, let me guess: he sells a line of lectin-blocking supplements. And, what do you know? "Assist your body in the fight against lectins" for only $79.95 a month—that's only like a thousand bucks a year—a bargain for "pleasant bathroom visits." And then, of course, there's ten other supplements. So, for only like eight or nine thousand dollars a year, you can lick those lectins. Oh, did I not mention his skin care line? "Firm + Sculpt" for an extra $120—all so much more affordable when you subscribe to his "VIP Club.". Aune D, Keum N, Giovannucci E, Fadnes LT, Boffetta P, Greenwood DC, Tonstad S, Vatten LJ, Riboli E, Norat T. Whole grain consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and all cause and cause specific mortality: systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies. BMJ. 2016 Jun 14;353:i2716. But, you still want to give him the benefit of the doubt. People ask me all the time to comment on some new blog or book or YouTube video, and I have to sadly be like, look, there are a hundred thousand peer-reviewed scientific papers on nutrition published in the medical literature every year, and we can barely keep up with those. So, when people told me about this book, I was like, let me guess: he sells a line of lectin-blocking supplements. And, what do you know? "Assist your body in the fight against lectins" for only $79.95 a month—that's only like a thousand bucks a year—a bargain for "pleasant bathroom visits." And then, of course, there's ten other supplements. So, for only like eight or nine thousand dollars a year, you can lick those lectins. Oh, did I not mention his skin care line? "Firm + Sculpt" for an extra $120—all so much more affordable when you subscribe to his "VIP Club.". Earlier this year, I started getting emails about this book, The Plant Paradox, purporting to expose "The Hidden Dangers in "Healthy" Foods That Cause Disease and Weight Gain"—foods like beans, and whole grains, and tomatoes. Why? Because of lectins, which is a rehashing of the discredited Blood Type Diet from decades ago. They just keep coming back. Yeah, but this was written by an M.D., which, if you've seen my medical school videos, you'll know is effectively an anti -credential when it comes to writing diet books—basically advertising to the world that you've received likely little or no formal training in nutrition. Dr. Atkins was, after all, a cardiologist. But look; you want to give the benefit of the doubt. The problem is that it doesn't even seem to pass the sniff test. Buettner D. The Blue Zones, 9 Lessons for Living Longer from the People Who've Lived the Longest. National Geographic Books; 2012. You'll note I never really addressed Dr. Gundry's thesis about lectins. That's what the next two videos are about—stay tuned: Li YF, Chang YY, Huang HC, Wu YC, Yang MD, Chao PM. Tomato juice supplementation in young women reduces inflammatory adipokine levels independently of body fat reduction. Nutrition. 2015 May;31(5):691-6. Earlier this year, I started getting emails about this book, The Plant Paradox, purporting to expose "The Hidden Dangers in "Healthy" Foods That Cause Disease and Weight Gain"—foods like beans, and whole grains, and tomatoes. Why? Because of lectins, which is a rehashing of the discredited Blood Type Diet from decades ago. They just keep coming back. Yeah, but this was written by an M.D., which, if you've seen my medical school videos, you'll know is effectively an anti -credential when it comes to writing diet books—basically advertising to the world that you've received likely little or no formal training in nutrition. Dr. Atkins was, after all, a cardiologist. But look; you want to give the benefit of the doubt. The problem is that it doesn't even seem to pass the sniff test. TEENs MT, Dorsett CS, King IB, Ostrander JG, Yamanaka WK. Effects of shellfish consumption on lipoproteins in normolipidemic men. Am J Clin Nutr. 1990 Jun;51(6):1020-7. Icons created by Eva Verbeek, Marco Galtarossa, Vladimir Belochkin, Dinosoft Labs, Rflor, B Farias, and Creative Outlet from The Noun Project. I mean, if lectins are bad, then beans would be the worst, and so bean counters would presumably find that bean eaters cut their lives short, whereas the exact opposite may be true with legumes (beans, split peas, chickpeas, and lentils)—found to be perhaps the most important dietary predictor of survival in older people in countries around the world. As Dan Buettner points out in his Blue Zones work, lectin-packed foods "are the cornerstones of" the diets of all the healthiest, longest-lived populations on the planet. Plant-based diets in general, and legumes in particular, are a common thread among longevity Blue Zones around the world—the most lectin-lush food there is. And, if lectins are bad, then whole grain consumers should be riddled with disease—when, in fact, "whole grain intake is associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease," the #1 killer of men and women; strokes, too; and total cancer; and mortality from all causes put together—meaning people who eat whole grains tend to live longer, and, get fewer "respiratory diseases, infectious diseases, diabetes, and all non-cardiovascular, non-cancer causes" to boot. And, not just in population studies. As I've shown, you can randomize people into whole-grain interventions, and prove cause-and-effect benefits. The same with tomatoes. You randomize women to a cup and a half of tomato juice or water every day, and all that nightshade tomato lectin reduces systemic inflammation, or has waist-slimming effects, reducing cholesterol as well as inflammatory mediators. I mean, that's unbelievable. That's the opposite of the truth. Add egg yolks to people's diets, and their cholesterol goes up. I mean, how dare he say this? And, it's not like some, you know, harmless foolishness like saying the Earth is flat or something. Heart disease is the #1 killer of men and women—this can actually hurt people. So much for my benefit of the doubt. Li YF, Chang YY, Huang HC, Wu YC, Yang MD, Chao PM. Tomato juice supplementation in young women reduces inflammatory adipokine levels independently of body fat reduction. Nutrition. 2015 May;31(5):691-6. Republishing "Dr. Gundry's The Plant Paradox Is Wrong". Icons created by Eva Verbeek, Marco Galtarossa, Vladimir Belochkin, Dinosoft Labs, Rflor, B Farias, and Creative Outlet from The Noun Project. TEENs MT, Dorsett CS, King IB, Ostrander JG, Yamanaka WK. Effects of shellfish consumption on lipoproteins in normolipidemic men. Am J Clin Nutr. 1990 Jun;51(6):1020-7. Below is an approximation of this video's audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. 
 

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Last Updated 8 December 2004